Last edited by Mutaur
Tuesday, April 21, 2020 | History

3 edition of Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States found in the catalog.

Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States

1988-1992 (Nih Publication)

by Barry A. Miller

  • 384 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Diane Books Publishing Company .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Forensic Medicine,
  • General,
  • Sociology,
  • Health/Fitness

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages138
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11100519M
    ISBN 100788145924
    ISBN 109780788145926

    This PA, Aging, Race, and Ethnicity in Prostate Cancer, is related to the priority area of cancer. Potential applicants may obtain a copy of "Healthy People " (Full Report: Stock No. or Summary Report: Stock No. ) through the Superintendent of Documents, Government Printing Office, Washington, DC   Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed visceral cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men. In , an estimated new cases and 31 deaths were projected for the United States (). Important racial and ethnic differences exist in Cited by: Racial Ethnic Groups in the United States Even in racism and ethic differences are a struggle in the United is mainly due to the fact that unlike fifty years ago when the country was split just black and white, there are now more races d, the generations now are much more knowledgeable about the ethic differences. According to new findings by researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the incidence of advanced breast cancer diagnosis among black women remained 30 percent to 90 percent higher compared to white women between and In addition, the disparity in the incidence of advance colorectal cancer actually widened over this time period as rates fell among whites but increased.


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Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States by Barry A. Miller Download PDF EPUB FB2

The information on this page is archived and provided for reference purposes only. Please go to the SEER homepage to access current information. Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in. Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, [Washington, D.C.]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Health, (OCoLC) Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, [Bethesda, Md.]: U.S.

Dept. of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, [] (OCoLC) United States population. The cancers included in this report are organized alphabetically. They are followed by a section on cancer control efforts in special population groups and an appendix.

The appendix contains tables showing the number of newly diagnosed cancers, by racial/ethnic group, in specific regions of the United States during. Seer Monograph: Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States [Miller, Barry A.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Barry A.

Miller. Racial/ethnic cancer treatment disparities have been observed for many cancer sites. We examine patterns of care in a population-based sample of African American, Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

United States; Grant by: Book: Racial/ethnic patterns of cancer in the United States, pp.A-8 + pp. Abstract: This monograph provides a description of the occurrence of the major cancers among several different racial/ ethnic groups ethnic groups Subject Category: People GroupsCited by:   Lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in both males and females and the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States (1).Lung cancer affects some races more than others; blacks have higher incidence and mortality rates than do whites (2,3).This report presents the first analysis of lung cancer incidence among racial/ethnic groups by U.S.

census region. The American Cancer Society, SEER, NCHS, and CDC combined efforts to produce a report card covering over 20 years of cancer experience in the United States, Cancer Incidence and Mortality, – A Report Card for the United States (Wingo et al., ), using data drawn from SEER and NCHS databases.

Rates of cancer for several ethnic Cited by: 2. We analyzed socioeconomic and racial/ethnic disparities in US mortality, incidence, and survival rates from all-cancers combined and major cancers from to Census-based deprivation indices were linked to national mortality and cancer data for area-based socioeconomic patterns in mortality, incidence, and survival.

The National Longitudinal Mortality Study was used to analyze Cited by:   The NCI has recognized the need to better define the cancer burden in racial/ethnic minorities and medically underserved populations and supports research, applications and surveillance on the full diversity of the United States population.

Since its inception inthe cancer registry system of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program has included large segments of. Editorial Note The findings in this report indicate lung cancer incidence during – was higher in the black population and in persons in the southern United States.

Vaccines can prevent infection with certain cancer-causing viruses. Byan estimated million people in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer every year.

This is a percent increase from that is due in part to the aging of the U.S. population and the greater use of cancer screening. The estimated number of annual cancer.

at the rate of about one cancer perper year, whereas the incidence is high in southern China ( perper year), among Eskimos in the Artic region, and among some indigenous populations in Southeast Asia.

Racial/ethnic patterns in lifetime and age-conditional risk estimates for selected cancers Article in Cancer (3) February with 19 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Second, the four racial/ethnic groups currently constitute about one-fourth of the population of this country, and the Bureau of the Census projects that by the non-Hispanic white population in the United States will total only 53 percent (Day ).

There has been interest in the issues raised by cancer statistics reported by race and ethnicity, particularly the perception that African-American males were dying more frequently than white males.

A SEER program publication entitled Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States –, 31 has been analyzed by Parker and associates, 32 and the following conclusions were made (Fig. DOI: /JCO Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print Janu PMID: Racial Patterns of Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Incidence and Survival in the United StatesCited by: African American women have the highest mortality rate for breast cancer among these same groups (31 per ,), while Chinese women have the lowest at 11 perSource: Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United StatesNCI.

Based on the monograph “Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States, –,” which presented the classifications total Hispanic, white Hispanic, and white non‐Hispanic, it was decided to calculate incidence rates for Hispanics and white non‐Hispanics for the current analysis.

Miller B, Kolonel L, Bernstein L, et al. (eds.) () Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States – National Institutes of Health Publication No.

96– Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Google ScholarCited by: Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women aged 40–55 in the United States and currently affects more than one in ten women worldwide.

The diverse ethnic, cultural, and geographic factors that characterize all of these broad racial/ethnic groups, but perhaps especially the Hispanic and API populations, will pose a real challenge to the understanding of elderly health and mortality patterns in the United States.

Racial/ethnic groups are characterized by internal variation by. Introduction. Between andcancer mortality rates declined by 26% in the United States.

1 This dramatic decline in mortality rates reflects improvements in the delivery of cancer prevention, screening, treatment, and survivorship care. 1 Although there has been significant progress, cancer outcomes in the United States vary substantially among populations defined by race/ethnicity Cited by: 7.

Racial/ethnic patterns of care, therefore, are also described in this review for cancer sites for which PDQ lists treatment options but no preferred treatment. To evaluate the existence of racial/ethnic disparities in the receipt of cancer treatment, we examined the published by: The last 20 years have seen an influx of Vietnamese immigrants to the United States as a result of the Vietnam War.

1 Bythe U.S. Vietnamese population had grown to over million, constituting the fourth largest Asian subgroup in the United States. 2 Despite the rapid growth of this group in recent years, little is known about its cancer incidence by: Health disparities in the United States: Social class, race, and health.

Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. and they are literally a matter of life and death. We can see this when we compare life expectancies for whites and African Americans born in (Table "U.S. Life Expectancy at Birth for People Born in ").

Racial/ethnic group differences in treatment decision‐making and treatment received among older breast carcinoma patients. Off-label use of cancer therapies in women diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States, SpringerPlus, /sz, 4, 1 A Year Book Quarterly, 19, 2, (), Cited by:   Lung cancer incidence,* by race/ethnicity and U.S.

census region — United States, – † * Average annual rates of lung cancer diagnosed per. Preventive Nutrition Issues in Ethnic and Socioeconomic Groups in the United States.

Authors; Kolonel LN, Bernstein L, Young JL Jr, Swanson GM, West D, et al., eds. Racial/Ethnic Patterns of Cancer in the United States –92, Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute.

() Preventive Nutrition Issues in Ethnic and Socioeconomic Cited by: Lung cancer death rates among women reflect smoking patterns over the past 50 years.

9 Beginning in the s, an epidemic of lung cancer has occurred among women (Figure ). 9 From tothe incidence of new cases of lung cancer among women increased by an average of % per year; from – the incidence increased by %.

Purpose To compare incidence and survival of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) subtypes among US racial/ethnic groups. Methods Patients with PTCL (age ≥ 15 years; to ) were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries.

Race/ethnicity was categorized as non-Hispanic white, black, Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic white, or American Indian/Alaskan Cited by:   This may again be reflective of differences in practice patterns and geographical availability of trials, since it is known that, overall, racial-ethnic minorities are much less likely to receive Cited by: 7.

Lung cancer rates are notably high among Chinese women in the United States and in Asia, which is puzzling, experts said, given the low prevalence of smoking in those populations. Breast Cancer Basic Facts 1 Table 1.

Estimated New Female Breast Cancer Cases and Deaths by Age, US, 1 Figure 1. Age-specific Female Breast Cancer Incidence Rates by Race/Ethnicity,US 2 Breast Cancer Occurrence 3 Table 2. Age-specific Probability of Developing Invasive Breast Cancer for US Women 4 Figure 2. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women aged 40–55 in the United States and currently affects more than one in ten women worldwide.

It is also one of the most diagnosed cancers in women both in wealthy and poor countries. Fortunately, the mortality rate from breast cancer has decreased in recent years due to increased emphasis on early detection and Cited by: Reviewed in the United States on November 6, This book has no place in a classroom nor a personal library.

The correct name of this book should be "White Males in America Are Inherently Evil". I truly wanted to learn more about ethic groups, races, cultures and peoples within American, however, this book only displayed hate rallying /5(6).

It is a medical puzzle: Why are death rates for black men with prostate cancer almost times the rate of white men in the United States. Part of the reason is unequal access to health care. This comprehensive survivorship report, a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute, provides current and projected cancer prevalence estimates for the United States, as well as data from the National Cancer Data Base on treatment patterns, and information on the common effects of cancer and its treatment.

Asian patients with gastric carcinoma in the United States exhibit unique clinical features and superior overall and cancer specific survival rates. Cancer, 89 (9), Tompar-Tiu, A., & Sustento-Seneriches, J. (). "Race and Ethnicity In The United States, 4/e" introduces the basic sociological concepts relevant to the study of race and ethnic relations, and gives a basic intellectual framework to approach this ever-changing and emotional facet of life in this country/5.Progress continues in reducing the burden of cancer in the United States.

There are unique racial/ethnic-specific incidence patterns for breast cancer subtypes; likely because of both biologic and social risk factors, including variation in mammography use. AbstractU.S.

early-life (ages 1–24) deaths are tragic, far too common, and largely preventable. Yet demographers have focused scant attention on U.S. early-life mortality patterns, particularly as they vary across racial and ethnic groups.

We employed the restricted-use – National Health Interview Survey–Linked Mortality Files and hazard models to examine racial/ethnic Cited by: 5.